Spider-Man tagged posts

Marvel Zombies (Halloween Special)

Kudos to the team who mated Night of the Living Dead with Rankin and Bass stop motion “Animagic.”

Marvel Zombies began as a five-issue limited series cover dated December 2005. Robert “Walking Dead” Kirkman wrote the series while Sean Phillips added the viscera visuals. Arthur Suydam provided covers.

The mini proved popular enough it has spawned a continuing franchise appearing as further short series and one-shots.

 

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Marvel Super Hero Adventures Halloween Spooktacular 1

Marvel Super Hero Adventures Halloween Spooktacular 1

Marvel Super Hero Adventures Halloween Spooktacular 1

Ya know what? This is just cute.

Sometimes it’s just nice to get back to something simple. A quick read for the bathroom or before bed. MSH Adventures Halloween Spooktacular 2018 is fun. No pretense. No drama. Clever story telling, told in a simple fashion.

“Sanctum Spooktorum” showcases Marvel’s current cinematic stars on an uninvited and ill-advised trip to Doctor Strange’s house.

Next up is “Spidey’s Super-Scary Stories,” which are anything, but scary.

Quitting the quips for a bit, Spider-Man becomes a story teller to a trio set on Halloween hijinks. Spidey spins three tales aimed more at the funny bone than the neck’s hackles.

Also included are the Daily Bugle funnies, Spider-Man maze and Iron Man coloring page.

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Hallmark Holiday ornaments (Part 2)

I hate it when Halloween is bypassed for Christmas, but we’re gonna break my self-imposed rule just this once. Hallmark is offering the following ornaments beginning today:

Santa Spidey

Santa Spidey

DC Comics Christopher Reeve as Superman Musical Ornament

DC Comics Batman Classic TV Series Batboat Ornament

DC Comics Batman Classic TV Series Batgirl Ornament

Marvel Studios Captain Marvel Mystery Box Ornament

Marvel Spider-Man Here Comes Spidey Claus Ornament

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Amazing Spider-Man (1963) 194

Believe it or not, there is a National Black Cat Appreciation Day. And, that day is today.

What better comic book to represent our ebon feline friend than Amazing Spider-Man (1963) 194, the first appearance of Felicia Hardy, aka the Black Cat.

The beauteous Black Cat originated from a textbook-Freud/Jung Father Complex. Felicia’s father was a notorious cat burglar. To earn his love and respect, she emulated her father and later tried to break him out of prison.

Amazing Spider-Man (1963) 194

Amazing Spider-Man (1963) 194

Her original appearance ended in the second issue of a two-part story arc as she fell, seemingly, to her death.
Felicia would return a year later in Amazing Spider-Man (1963) 204 for another two-part story line. This time her affections would be focused on Spider-Man.

Eventually a romance did bloom. Felicia repented of her criminal ways and became Spider-Man’s lover. I say Spider-Man, because the thought of Peter Parker and his mundane life outside the costume repulsed her.

She would go on to secure “powers” from the Kingpin allowing her to induce black cat hoodoo against anyone wishing to do her harm.

Eventually Spider-Man and Black Cat would go their separate ways.

Felicia has had a healthy career in the Marvel Universe as a sexy siren. In addition to appearing in various Marvel mags throughout the years, Felicia has starred and co-starred in mini-series sporting her name and image.

To properly observe the day, National Day Calendar suggests consideration of adopting a black cat.

Four Color Holidays suggests you curl up with several favorite issues featuring the felonious feline with your favorite real life feline.

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“Deck the Halls with Marvel Comics”

Before Black Friday was a thing, Marvel Comics Company tried to help the holiday shopper with this house ad for the perfect gift.

Apparently the thought of not having to fight holiday shoppers for the gifts is enough to set Magneto, Doc Ock and Dr. Doom caroling.

In addition to staying home, shoppers have the knowledge they may cancel their subscription at any time if not satisfied, orders are delivered right to their door, they will save a whopping $7.20 off newsstand prices and are offered the lowest price on renewals.

Santa Spidey continues to plug the ad by exhorting, “Your first two 12-issue subscriptions cost $6 each—or just $.50 per copy!

“Each additional 12-issue subscription you order for yourself or a friend costs only $4.50 each—or just $.38 per copy!”

This was a time when Marvel offered just 25-regular titles. Special titles included the Micronauts, Moon Knight, Ka-Zar, What If…?, King Conan and Marvel Fanfare.

Too bad the ad expired Jan. 31, 1983 considering what comic books cost today.

According to Wikipedia, Black Friday didn’t receive its name until recently even though the day after Thanksgiving has been considered the kick off for Christmas shopping since 1952.

“Deck the Halls with Marvel Comics”

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Amazing Fantasy (1962) 15

Based on today’s headline, any comic fan should be able to guess this is National Spider-Man Day.

Created by Stan Lee and Steve Ditko, Spider-Man first appeared in Amazing Fantasy issue 15. Other stories included were “The Bell Ringer!,” “Man in the Mummy Case!” and “There are Martians Among Us!”

Amazing Fantasy (1962) 15

Amazing Fantasy (1962) 15

When sales figures returned for what was the final issue of the title, Spider-Man proved a financial success. He returned in his own book, The Amazing Spider-Man in March of 1963. Lee and Ditko continued to chronicle his exploits to issue 38 when Ditko left. Lee remained scripter until issue 100.

Though the Fantastic Four were recruited to help bolster sales for the first issue, it quickly became apparent the guest stars were not needed. In little time Spider-Man became the flagship of the Marvel Universe.

By mid-decade Spider-Man was as recognizable and popular as Bob Dylan. In 1972 he received a second series, Marvel Team-Up. As the title may indicate, Spider-Man would join other heroes for one-and-dones or story arcs.

In 1976 a third book was devoted to the character, Peter Parker, the Spectacular Spider-Man. This one dealt more into the Web Head’s alter ego.

In 1985 Marvel Team-Up ceased publication. Web of Spider-Man replaced it, focused solely on Spider-Man.

Since then titles have popped up or ceased publication, but always sold well.

Spider-Man first appeared on television during Saturday mornings. Spider-Man ’67, as it’s become known, ran from 1967-70. Spidey shared television time with himself in the early 1980s when Spider-Man and Spider-Man and his Amazing Friends ran concurrently. Fox Kids studios would option a series in the 1990s running five seasons and 65 episodes. Spider-Man Unlimited followed.

A CGI series aired following the Spider-Man movie. Not until 2008 would he return in animated form. This time in The Spectacular Spider-Man beginning March 8. Ultimate Spider-Man followed on Disney XD in 2012.

The character’s two lone forays into live action on television were the Electric Company shorts and syndicated The Amazing Spider-Man starring Nicholas Hammond.

A Japanese version aired in 1978.

Spider-Man broke into Hollywood with a feature film in 2002. That was followed by two more before the franchise was rebooted in 2012. Spider-Man Homecoming, released in 2017, was a second retooling of the character on the silver screen. Most recently was Spider-Man: Far From Home.

In addition to the small and big screen appearances, Spider-Man has been featured in pretty much every medium there is to offer. His comic books continue to sell and his likeness is one of the best recognized in the world.

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Hallmark Holiday ornaments

It’s too early for Christmas, but Four Color Holidays is not about judging anyone. Not to their face, anyway. So, let’s look at the new Hallmark ornaments available today at your finer Hallmark retailers.

Wonder Woman

Wonder Woman

Mini-DC Justice League Aquaman Ornament

Mini-DC Justice League Green Lantern Ornament

DC Comics Batman Ornament

DC Comics Wonder Woman Invisible Jet Ornament

Marvel Studios Avengers: Endgame Infinity Gauntlet Ornament with Light

Marvel Studios Avengers: Endgame Thanos Ornament

Marvel Studios Avengers: Endgame Captain America Ornament

Marvel Iron Man Metal Ornament

 

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Amazing Spider-Man (1962) 2

National Camera Day may not be much reason for most to celebrate, but maybe it’ll give you an excuse to re-read some vintage Spider-Man comic books.

Amazing Spider-Man (1962) 2

Amazing Spider-Man (1962) 2

I’ll admit I’ve lost track of the Web Slinger. Calling him a Web Slinger may even date me. I wasn’t around for Amazing Spider-Man issue one, but I’ve been around for a lot of the others over the years. To be honest, I’m not sure where and what is going on with the Spider-Man titles these days.

Amazing Spider-Man 133 is, maybe, the first Spidey I remember reading. Maybe. That or the issue before.

Anyway, by issue 132 or 133 Spider-Man was fairly established. He had a substantial rogues gallery and had been working at the Daily Bugle since issue two.

That’s how we’re shoehorning in the second issue of Amazing Spider-Man for National Camera Day.

At the behest of Jolly J. Jonah Jameson himself, Peter Parker possibly started the selfie craze by photographing himself in action against the Vulture.

That was the beginning of Mr. Parker’s photojournalism career. As a freelancer, Peter was able to keep his aunt in medicine, himself in web fluid and just make the rent payment.

It also introduced an extended cast of characters including his first love, Betty Brant.

To observe National Camera Day, snap a photograph of someone you enjoy. Post photos on social media using #NationalCameraDay.

We suggest you toss in some choice issues of Amazing Spider-Man, Marvel Team-Up and Peter Parker, the Spectacular Spider-Man.

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The Mighty Marvel holiday Wish List (1990)

Comic book shops were common place by the beginning of the 1990s, but original graphic novels and trade paperbacks were not.

The Might Marvel holiday Wish List, sporting a caroling Spidey, Hulk and Cap, was a festive gift guide for the comic book fan. What could be simpler? Make a check beside the corresponding title, hand it to the gift giver and wait for Christmas morning.

Looking back at this pre-internet solicitation reminds me of how far the industry has come. Of course I forget this is 30 years ago.

The Mighty Marvel holiday Wish List (1990)

The Mighty Marvel holiday Wish List (1990)

The year 1990 doesn’t seem that long ago. Saying 30 years does.

Anyway, 30-years ago trades and collections were not the norm. Marvel had its high-end Masterworks and DC its Archive editions. Those were available in most comic book shops and retail book chains. They were just pricey for the day.

Trades were much more reasonable, but still a novelty. That’s why it’s so odd looking at the ad paper and seeing so few story arcs collected.

Readers must also remember this was a time when stories were written from beginning to end with no worries about how they would fit in a trade.

As much as I love Neil Gaiman and Sandman, I blame the wordsmith for the advent of trade-length story arcs. He invented the four- to six-issue story arc with a few one-and-dones in between that seem to have become the industry standard for trades.

So, sit back and check out the Mighty Marvel holiday Wish List – in full – courtesy ComicBookDaily.com. It’s a nostalgic look at the not-so-distant past.

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Marvel Holiday Special (2005)

Marvel recycled the cover and stories for its Marvel Holiday Special trade, but the original 2005 one-shot was all original.

Marvel Holiday Special (2005)

Marvel Holiday Special (2005)

Shaenon K. Garrity serves up a jaunty pre-Christmas tale with shades of Citizen Kane. The Fantastic Four and Namor celebrate the holiday to satisfy an aggrieved Moleman’s childhood fancy in “Moleman’s Christmas.”

The disgruntled youth’s misgiving-theme is continued in “Yes, Virginia, There is a Santatron.” Spider-Man swings in late for the annual Avenger’s Christmas party. An unexpected – and unwanted – guest arrives in a Tannenbaum trimmed Trojan horse. Heroes prove their mettle as they circumvent the intrusion with a confederate confection.

Marvel’s holiday season comes to a close with “Christmas Day in Manhattan.” A rhythmic recital has the Fantastic Four saving another holiday from a poor-intentioned father. Their mercy provides presents for the innocents.

This 2005 edition is a worthy addition to any collector’s repository. A goodly portion of the Marvel U appears in either leading rolls or in cameos. The stories are heartwarming without being saccharine and the feeling of the season is almost tangible.

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