Posts Tagged ‘Flash’

Posted Saturday, August 24th, 2019 by Barry

Wonder Woman (1942) 213

Continuing the tale of Wonder Woman and her 12 labors, the second was observed by Flash. The Amazon princess was at odds with a robot bent on spreading peace.

Wonder Woman (1942) 213

Wonder Woman (1942) 213

As America attempted to extricate itself from Viet Nam in the early 1970s and politicians like Henry Kissinger became celebrities, mediums like television, movies and, yes, even comic books took notice.

DC wasn’t the only comic book company to parlay the events of the day into fantasy fodder. Marvel’s Super-Villain Team-Up used the name and likeness of Kissinger. Captain America became a man with no country as Nomad when he turned his back on the United States following Watergate.

At National, pre-DC days, Kissinger became Hans Krissen and even courted Diana Prince.

The issue revolved around the notion Earth had succumb to pacifism. Inhabitants can no longer defend themselves against ordinary dangers. Wonder Woman discovers she and two others are immune and must challenge the cause.

Of course they succeed and the world is allowed to return to its barbaric ways. The Flash, who has been observing Wonder Woman’s trial, reported she proved extraordinary in her efforts. She is therefore recommended for reinstatement to the Justice League.

Enjoy the countdown to Labor Day with Wonder Woman’s 12 labors with more tomorrow.

Posted Monday, May 27th, 2019 by Barry

Justice Society of America (2007) 50

Timing publication for Memorial Day 2011, Justice Society of America issue 50 is a two-fold celebration.

Beginning with the June cover date, the issue remembers those who have fallen in service to their country. Secondly, it pays homage to All-Star Comics (1940) issue 27.

Hitting newsstands for Winter 1945, All-Star’s “A Place in This World” is prophetic in its title. Having just closed the book on World War II, America was ready to take its place among the world powers.

Sixty-six years later the former National Periodicals has become DC Comics, America has taken a spot on the world stage and the heroes who made both publisher and nation great still exist.

In the first story, “Cornerstone,” Modern Age heroes reveal how their Golden Age forefathers influenced them. “Infinitum” showcases Robin and Huntress. Story three, “Truth & Justice,” harkens back to McCarthy-era America and the trials a nation faced in fear.

Finally, “Inaugural” focuses on the first family of speed with Jay Garrick and Jesse Quick.

Also included in the over-sized edition is a “special sneak preview” of Batman: Arkham City.

Memorial Day is observed the last Monday of May to remember those who died while serving in the United States Armed Forces. The federal holiday was previously observed on May 30 from 1868 to 1970.

Decorating soldier’s graves was first recorded in 1861 in Warrenton, VA. The following year it was noted Confederate soldiers were honored in the same way by the women of Savannah, GA. A cemetery dedication was held in 1863 in Gettysburg, PA.

In 1868 the southern tradition was adopted as a nationwide observance called Dedication Day. The inaugural northern Memorial Day was held May 30 that same year.

 

Posted Tuesday, May 7th, 2019 by Barry

Comic Cavalcade (1942) 5

Just a Christmas cover with a creepy Santa Claus for the 1943 winter edition of Comic Cavalcade.

In the heat of the second World War almost half the issue is propaganda. Filler between headliners Flash, Wonder Woman and Green Lantern are illustrated tales of heroism on both the European and Pacific fronts. The “Real Life Story of George Philip Corl” features the decorated sergeant who was wounded three times before taking down a Messerschmitt over North Africa.

Comic Cavalcade (1942) 5

Comic Cavalcade (1942) 5

Hop Harrigan sinks a Japanese destroyer and a convoy of troop ships in “Combined Operations.”

“Reel Life to Real Life” is spy hunt involving a soldier, sailor and Marine in Hollywood.

Wonder Woman is featured in “Mystery of the Crimson Flame.” The Amazon finds herself in Arabia to solve the mystery of the story’s title.

Green Lantern sidekick Doiby Dickles’ hat is lost and found while foiling the plans of fashion thieves.

Man-eating plants annoy the Flash in “The Plant That Challenged the World”.

Also included as reading fare are Sargon the Sorcerer and Mutt & Jeff.

Posted Thursday, February 28th, 2019 by Barry

DC Universe Christmas TPB (2000)

DC opened the new millennium with a gift-wrapped Christmas trade in both cover and manner. Readers traverse holidays from the Golden to Modern Age of comic books in 160 pages.

As diverse as the stories, the characters chosen for the Tanenbaum tome are even more so. From the old west with Bat Lash to World War I Enemy Ace to wayward West waif Impulse back from the future.

Story wise are Frank Miller’s first take on the Dark Knight, “Santa Claus – Dead or Alive!”

Flash stars in the first of two “Present Tense” stories.

“The Story of the Fir Balsam” is a Golden Age story from Sensation (Mystery) Comics (1941) issue 14 involving Nazi spies.

Superman shines in “The Gift.”

One holiday tale that always pops up is “A Swingin’ Christmas Carol” featuring The Teen Titans. The original Teen Titans. Complete with hip and mod slang for the times. Those times were the 1960s; 1966 to be exact.

Darkseid appears in the second “Present Tense” story, guest starring Santa.

Captain Marvel Adventures (1941) issue 69 is been reprinted featuring “Billy Batson’s Xmas!”

“Alone for the Holidays” proves Robin will always have family.

DC Universe Christmas TPB (2000)

DC Universe Christmas TPB (2000)

The Legion of Super Heroes star in “Star Light, Star Bright…Farthest Star I see Tonight!”

“The Present” teams Green Lantern and Green Arrow again.

“Night Prowler!” is from House of Mystery (1951) 191.

“The Harley and the Ivy” is a lush retelling from The Batman Adventures Holiday Special.

Sandman and Sandy take readers back to the Golden Age of comic books again with “Santa Fronts for the Mob.” The story originally appeared in Adventure Comics (1938) issue 32.

“An Eye for Detail” showcases old west dandy Bat Lash.

Enemy Ace takes a break from the hell of war in “Silent Night.”

Impulse plays Santa’s helper in “No, Bart, This is No Santa Claus.”

Finally, Superman closes out the book with what could possibly be DC’s first super-powered driven Christmas story in “Superman’s Christmas Adventure” from 1940.

Posted Wednesday, February 20th, 2019 by Barry

Flash (1987) 87

Flash (1987) 87

Flash (1987) 87

Wally West earned the red union suit he sped through the post-crisis DCU wearing.

He has been part of the Speed Force since Flash (1959) 110. Originally a guest in his uncle-by-marriage’s book, Wally became a back-up feature. Later he would be one of the original Teen Titans.

When Silver Age-mentor Flash, Barry Allen, died (not really) in Crisis on Infinite Earths, Wally assumed the Scarlet Speedster’s mantle. By issue 87 Mark Waid was at the book’s helm. Under his guidance Wally sped through two holiday stories; the first in issue 73.

With issue 87 Wally is attempting to spend Christmas Eve with loved ones. Silver-Age holdover Abra Kadabra is the foil in Flash’s plans.

Issue 87 is a good example of how to continue an ongoing story arc while celebrating Christmas.

Posted Tuesday, January 1st, 2019 by Jeff

Happy New Year!

Cheer up, Batman.

Artwork by The-Blackcat.

Happy New Year!

Posted Friday, December 28th, 2018 by Barry

DC’s Nuclear Winter Special

Rip Hunter, Time Master, plays storyteller to a group of post-apocalyptic survivors sometime in the mid-21st century who are bent on eating their guest.

DC's Nuclear Winter Special

DC’s Nuclear Winter Special

Of the 10 “cataclysmic carols,” Flash, Super Girl, Firestorm and Green Arrow top the list.

Hunter stalls for time, waiting for his time sphere to recharge, by relating stories starring the stable of DC characters. This year’s special is hit or miss in wringing emotion from readers.

As stated above, Flash’s “Once and Future,” Super Girl’s “Last Daughters,” Firestorm’s “Last Christmas” and Green Arrow’s “Super Birds of Christmas past, Present and Future” are the headliners.

“Last Christmas” may be the best of that group. Paul Dini is the writer, so no surprise there.

The remainder of the book is taken up by Damion Wayne having assumed the mantle of Batman in “Warmth.”
Superman’s “Memory Hearth” by Steve Orlando is forgettable.

“Where Light Cannot Reach” capitalizes on Aquaman and his silver screen blockbuster that has already taken China by storm.

Surprise guest Kamandi stars in “Northern Lights.”

Finally, Catwoman appears in “Nine Lives.”

Not as memorable as the DC Rebirth Holiday Special. Just nice to see DC continues to offer Christmas comics each year.

Posted Tuesday, December 25th, 2018 by Jeff

Merry Christmas!

Cheer up, Batman.

Artwork by The-Blackcat.

Merry Christmas!

Posted Sunday, December 2nd, 2018 by Jeff

‘Tis The Season…

Wonder Woman holds her own with DC’s 2006 holiday card.  Artist unknown (let us know).

2006 DC holiday card

Posted Wednesday, November 28th, 2018 by Barry

Flash (1987) 73

Wally West assumed the mantle of Flash following DC’s condensing of multiple universes with Crisis on Infinite Earths in 1985. Prior, Wally was a back-up feature in the Barry Allen Flash comic book first appearing in issue 110 (Flash 1959). Later he would become a founding member of the junior Justice

Flash (1987) 73

League called the Teen Titans as Kid Flash.

Barry Allen “died” in issue eight of the original Crisis imprints sacrificing himself to save the multiverse. A sad event for us Silver-Age fans of the Scarlet Speedster.

Yet the rebooted Flash (1987) with Wally in the red togs was an excellent series. Enough so Mark Waid’s “Christmas Rush” is a little disappointing. Not that it’s a bad story, but you feel it’s a bit rushed. Pun intended.

Wally and Golden-Age Flash, Jay Garrack, spend Christmas Eve as Santa’s helpers averting disaster where they find it. Their night ends with a Christmas Miracle, helped along by Wally, as a young family finds redemption in remorse and new beginnings.

As eve turns to Christmas day, Wally is reminded simpler presents are the most meaningful.