Archive for the ‘DC Comics’ Category

Posted Saturday, July 13th, 2019 by Barry

Hallmark Holiday ornaments

Posted Sunday, June 16th, 2019 by Barry

Lobo: Infanticide

Happy Father’s Day.

Not everyone is appreciative of raising a child. Lobo for example. DC’s Main Man has fathered an army of illegitimate children over the years. Due to his reputation the bastard babies have grown to become despised by the other denizens of the universe.

One is fighting back. Daughter Su has inherited her sire’s stones and enlisted a legion of step-brothers and sisters – over 200 – to avenge their shameful situation.

The four-part play is conducted as follows:  a plan is formed, executed and foiled as Lobo shows he’s DC’s best-at-what-he-does.

And, like his mimeographed Marvel mate, what he does isn’t nice.

Father’s Day is purported to have begun as a memorial service for a group of West Virginia miners who died in 1907. Father’s Day is a complement to Mother’s Day, celebrated the third Sunday in June.

Posted Wednesday, June 12th, 2019 by Barry

Action Comics (1938) 1

Today is Superman Day. A day to pay homage to the last son of Krypton and the first super hero.

Superman, aka Kal-El/Clark Kent, was born in the minds of Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster. When the two failed to crack the newspaper strip field they sold their creation to Detective Comics, Inc.

Action Comics (1938) 1

Action Comics (1938) 1

The first Superman story appeared in Action Comics issue one April 18, 1938. Superman proved popular enough he was given his own self-titled book a year later. That was the same year the Man of Steel finally broke into newspapers with a daily strip.

Superman branched out into other media as well. That included radio with The Adventures of Superman running for 2,088 episodes from 1940 to 1950. In movie theaters the man of tomorrow first appeared in animated form. Fleischer Studios brought Superman to life in nine cartoon shorts while Famous Studios drew another eight.

Superman and the Mole Men was the first live-action film released in 1951. Christopher Reeve would rekindle the romance between fanboy and film in 1978 with the first of four big-budget films.

Superman Returns was released in 2006 with the franchise resurrected most recently in 2013 with Man of Steel. Henry Cavill recreated his Superman for Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice in 2016 and Justice League in 2017.

George Reeves made Superman a household name when he portrayed him on Adventures of Superman airing from 1952-58. Superman would also be played by Dean Cain in Lois & Clark and Tom Welling in Smallville.

The Man of Steel would be represented in animation several more times over the decades. The New Adventures of Superman from 1966 to 1970 and Superman the Animated Series from 1996 to 2000. And, in other DCU-animated series such as Justice League.

Not bad for humble beginnings.

Superman comic books have never been out of publication since he first appeared in 1938. Action Comics 1,000 was published in June of 2018. Superman stood tall and proud for the occasion.

Posted Monday, May 27th, 2019 by Barry

Justice Society of America (2007) 50

Timing publication for Memorial Day 2011, Justice Society of America issue 50 is a two-fold celebration.

Beginning with the June cover date, the issue remembers those who have fallen in service to their country. Secondly, it pays homage to All-Star Comics (1940) issue 27.

Hitting newsstands for Winter 1945, All-Star’s “A Place in This World” is prophetic in its title. Having just closed the book on World War II, America was ready to take its place among the world powers.

Sixty-six years later the former National Periodicals has become DC Comics, America has taken a spot on the world stage and the heroes who made both publisher and nation great still exist.

In the first story, “Cornerstone,” Modern Age heroes reveal how their Golden Age forefathers influenced them. “Infinitum” showcases Robin and Huntress. Story three, “Truth & Justice,” harkens back to McCarthy-era America and the trials a nation faced in fear.

Finally, “Inaugural” focuses on the first family of speed with Jay Garrick and Jesse Quick.

Also included in the over-sized edition is a “special sneak preview” of Batman: Arkham City.

Memorial Day is observed the last Monday of May to remember those who died while serving in the United States Armed Forces. The federal holiday was previously observed on May 30 from 1868 to 1970.

Decorating soldier’s graves was first recorded in 1861 in Warrenton, VA. The following year it was noted Confederate soldiers were honored in the same way by the women of Savannah, GA. A cemetery dedication was held in 1863 in Gettysburg, PA.

In 1868 the southern tradition was adopted as a nationwide observance called Dedication Day. The inaugural northern Memorial Day was held May 30 that same year.

 

Posted Tuesday, May 7th, 2019 by Barry

Comic Cavalcade (1942) 5

Just a Christmas cover with a creepy Santa Claus for the 1943 winter edition of Comic Cavalcade.

In the heat of the second World War almost half the issue is propaganda. Filler between headliners Flash, Wonder Woman and Green Lantern are illustrated tales of heroism on both the European and Pacific fronts. The “Real Life Story of George Philip Corl” features the decorated sergeant who was wounded three times before taking down a Messerschmitt over North Africa.

Comic Cavalcade (1942) 5

Comic Cavalcade (1942) 5

Hop Harrigan sinks a Japanese destroyer and a convoy of troop ships in “Combined Operations.”

“Reel Life to Real Life” is spy hunt involving a soldier, sailor and Marine in Hollywood.

Wonder Woman is featured in “Mystery of the Crimson Flame.” The Amazon finds herself in Arabia to solve the mystery of the story’s title.

Green Lantern sidekick Doiby Dickles’ hat is lost and found while foiling the plans of fashion thieves.

Man-eating plants annoy the Flash in “The Plant That Challenged the World”.

Also included as reading fare are Sargon the Sorcerer and Mutt & Jeff.

Posted Friday, April 19th, 2019 by Barry

The Unexpected (1968) 202

Host Abel welcomes readers to the House of Secrets library.

The Unexpected (1968) 202

The Unexpected (1968) 202

“Hopping Down the Bunny Trail” has no Peter Cottontail in this cautionary Easter story. Rather, the youth are held accountable for their treatment of confectionary bunnies over the years. Michael Uslan and Tenny Henson serve up this unsavory tale, darkening the pastel holiday.

Carl Wessler and Torre Repiso take the lead in “Death Trap,” the actual first story of the book. An escapee from the local asylum terrorizes the wrong person.

Following DC’s implosion in 1978, the three witches from The Witching Hour found residence with fellow refuge Abel. They take a turn at two tales, “The Midnight Messenger!” and “The Creature in the Park.”

In the first, a believed deal with the devil proves to be more celestial. By their second and final story nature turns the tables on (in)humanity.

Posted Tuesday, April 16th, 2019 by Barry

Sensation Comics (1942) 38

Wonder Woman opens Sensation Comics issue 38 with a Noel novella not to be found in any Christmas collection.

Creator William Moulton Marston describes the yule-time action that follows in the opening blurb:

“Using her Amazon airplane instead of reindeer, Wonder Woman plays Santa Claus for poor children, filling their empty stockings with presents and their longing hearts with love for the world’s most beautiful girl!

Sensation Comics (1942) 38

Sensation Comics (1942) 38

“But the lovely Amazon Princess lands in plenty to excitement and danger too, when she leaps from Miss Santa Claus’ sky charger into a hidden nest of vicious gold vault robbers. To save her two young friends, Pete and Gertie, Wonder Woman is compelled to surrender herself captive to these ruthless plunderers!

None but the maid from Paradise Isle, beautiful as Aphrodite, wise as Athena, stronger than Hercules and swifter than Mercury, could possibly escape the dangers and ordeals which confront Wonder Woman when ‘Racketeers Kidnap Miss Santa Claus’.”

Amid pleas for war bonds and ads for cereal the book is rounded out with “The Story of Sir Francis Drake,” Little Boy Blue and the Blue Boys in “Treasure for 10 cents,” “Vandals Desecrate Churches” with The Gay Ghost in an untitled short and Wildcat in “Meet Mr. Waffles.”

Also tossed in to meet requirements for a cheaper mailing rate is the two-page text tale “Double Cross.”

Posted Saturday, April 13th, 2019 by Barry

Scooby-Doo (1997) 127

No holiday story, just a colorful Christmas cover for this indicia-dated February 2008 issue.

Included are three stories. “Family Monster” is the first. Velma drags the gang to Germany for the reading of a will at Castle Von Dinkley. The kids help a Frankenstein monster clone keep his home. Script by Greg Thompson and pencils by Jaime Garcia Corral.

“Football Fiend” follows with the gang foiling plans to sabotage a new stadium. Robbie Nely and Dan Davis do the honors.

The “Freeloading Ghost” finds himself homeless with plans to avenge his eviction. Scooby-Doo shows some unaccustomed bravado when the specter over-steps his bounds. All courtesy of Darryl Taylor Kravitz and Karen Matchette.

Scooby-Doo (1997) 127

Posted Monday, April 1st, 2019 by Barry

Harley Quinn and the Suicide Squad April Fools’ Special (2016) 1

This one is a real stretch. Beyond the title, there’s no real April Fools shenanigans. What the issue does is act as a launch pad for Rob Williams’ Suicide Squad series to follow.

Jim Lee bookends the title with his artwork while Sean “Cheeks” Galloway takes care of the dream sequence pages. Williams sets the stage with his script.

The book is mainly Harley acting as her own Ying and Yang. Psychoanalyzing herself, Harley finds she is drawn to good – as long as she can still indulge her naughty tendencies. Her dream serves as a sounding board to her struggle between light and dark.

The book itself is designed to complement the upcoming Suicide Squad movie and comic book. Neither seemed to fare well.

Posted Wednesday, March 20th, 2019 by Barry

Lobo’s Big Babe Spring Break Special

No matter the weather, today is the first day of spring. To usher out the end of another winter the Last Czarnian, the Main Man, the bastich himself:  Lobo plays bodyguard to eight of the galaxy’s most beautiful college students. All to crown the next Miss Voluptua.

Only no one is who they seem.

Lobo’s Big Babe Spring Break Special

Lobo’s Big Babe Spring Break Special

Lobo is called in to do what he does best. Or, one of the things he does best. Lobo is to ensure no harm comes to the beauty pageant contestants. In the new and enlightened era of political correctness the Miss Voluptua ’95 contest is at risk from renegade factions protesting the objectification of women.

Alan Grant continues scripting chores sans mentor Keith Giffen. Jim Balent handles penciling duties.

Lobo first appeared in Omega Men issue three. He would continue to make cameos throughout the DC Universe in such titles as Justice League International, L.E.G.I.O.N. and its sequel R.E.B.E.L.S. before earning his self-titled, solo four-issue mini-series in 1990.

The Main Man would continue to star in one-shots and minis throughout his mercenary career including Lobo’s Paramilitary Christmas Special, Lobo’s Back, Lobo Blazing Chain of Love, Lobo Infanticide, Lobo Portrait of a Victim and Lobo Unamerican Gladiators. His own title came in 1993 and ran till 1999.